Corey Daniels Interview Pic

What do you do here?

I'm a product designer, focusing on user experience and interaction design. I do all kinds of things from product/user research, to visual design, to 3D modeling and printing.

How long have you been at SDW?

1.5 years or so.

Why do you want to live and work in Charlotte?

Charlotte is a fun town. It's like the perfect size considering there's lots to do, but it remains easy to get around.

Why work at SDW?

The people here are awesome and I'm always surrounded by the opportunity to learn new things. You'll never get bored here.

Drop some Knowledge. (Can be anything)

I was in a season of the Real World... well, not me, but a giant curtain I made.

Talk about your affinity with our resident MakerBot.

Well, I don't really know how I feel about MakerBot, cause I have my roots in the RepRap open-source 3d-printing world. Up until a few years ago, MakerBot was all open source as well. I was really excited about what they were doing because it seemed like they had the potential to be a really successful consumer-focused, open-source company. There just aren't many of those around. Unfortunately, they later decided to go closed source which is a bit of a bummer. Them being open-source had a huge part in their early success and to see them turn their back on it and the community angered a lot of people. That said, I understand why they did it from a business perspective.

Skookum's MakerBot

What's the best thing you've ever designed? (What are you most proud of)

Some of my favorite Industrial Design work was with a little initiative we called Relative Design. It was basically the product of a fellow designer and my frustrations at a previous job. We were just looking for another creative outlet and the chance to explore some interesting manufacturing schemes. We basically designed a few products that could be made on-demand by leveraging technologies like laser cutting and flat-pack shipping.

For example, we had a chandelier, that when ordered would trigger a laser cutting service to make the parts, which would be shipped to us where we would throw in instructions and branding stuff, then send it on to the customer. It basically allowed us to sell products without having to maintain any inventory.

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